Tag Archives: Labour Manifesto

Local Government Reps 2018 Annual NEC Report

The last 12 months have been very busy for Labour’s National Executive Committee. The sudden general election meant the years of work that usually go into selecting candidates and writing a manifesto had to be completed in weeks. We were proud of our role in drafting the 2017 manifesto, which showcased some popular policies pioneered by local Councils and presenting the country with Labour’s positive vision for Britain to counter Tory negativity and gloom.

The NEC also oversaw a leadership election in Scotland and a Deputy Leader election in Wales. We said goodbye to General Secretary Iain McNicol, who has always been a good friend to local government, and welcomed new GS Jennie Formby. We voted for Jennie and look forward to working with her to deliver the key priorities for the year ahead.

Priorities for the NEC following the snap general election last June have been: Continue reading

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Making Islington a Fairer Place for All – 2018 Manifesto

Islington is a wonderful place, but we know that too many people struggle to have decent housing, are out of work and do not have the same chances in life as others.

We are committed to making our borough a fairer place for all by tackling these issues.

Our ‘Making Islington a Fairer Place for All’ manifesto for the 2018 local elections, which will take place on 3rd May 2018, sets out a radical agenda for the borough’s future.

Between 2018 and 2022, we will –

  • build at least 550 new council homes, as we deliver 1,900 new genuinely affordable homes by 2022, and crack down on rogue private landlords.
  • support another 4,000 local people into good quality jobs, guarantee support for young people to get apprenticeships and pay all Council staff at least the real London Living Wage.
  • give all young people in Islington the best start in life, guarantee 100 hours of work-related experience by 16 and invest in targeted support for those at risk of turning to crime.
  • save people money on the cost of living through Council-run energy provider Angelic Energy, protect free school meals for all primary and nursery school pupils and keep Council Tax below the London average.
  • still make a difference with less – despite massive cuts by the Tory Government to the Council, we will protect essential services like weekly bin collections, keep all libraries open and maintain support services for older residents.

Continue reading

2018 National Policy Forum activity and how you can get involved

The next General Election could be months away. It could be in May 2022. With this in mind, Labour’s National Policy Forum is working to build on the popular 2017 Manifesto and help prepare for a possible incoming Labour government.

The NPF Policy Commissions are meeting this month to finalise the consultation documents that will be sent to members for discussion and debate. A full NPF meeting will take place on 17 and 18 February, where the various representatives will meet to consider policies for a future Labour government. The consultation topics include:

  • TOWARDS A NATIONAL EDUCATION SERVICE (Early Years, Education & Skills Policy Commission Co-Chaired by Angela Rayner and Christine Shawcroft)
  • A FAIR DEAL AT WORK: The future of work (Economy, Business & Trade Commission Co-Chaired by John McDonnell and Jennie Formby)
  • LEADING RICHER LIVES: A Greener Britain (Environment, Energy and Culture Commission Co-Chaired by Sue Hayman and Margaret Beckett)
  • HEALTHCARE FOR ALL: Tackling health inequalities (Health & Social Care Commission Co-Chaired by Jonathan Ashworth and Keith Birch)
  • LEADING RICHER LIVES: Giving people the power to shape their local communities (Housing, Local Government & Transport Commission Co-Chaired by Andrew Gwynne and Jim Kennedy)
  • A GLOBAL BRITAIN: Achieving Sustainable Development Goals (International Policy Commission Co-Chaired by Emily Thornberry and Cath Speight)
  • SAFER COMMUNITIES: Protecting our communities and turning lives around (Justice and Home Affairs Commission Co-Chaired by Diane Abbott and Alice Perry)
  • EQUALITY FOR ALL: Addressing in-work poverty and working age inequalities (Work, Pensions and Equality Co-Chaired by Debbie Abrahams and Diana Holland)

Continue reading

NEC Report: Clause 5 Manifesto Meeting

The Labour Party General Election Manifesto is agreed at a special meeting, known as the Clause Five Meeting. This meeting is attended by representatives from across the Labour movement including the trade unions, local government, Scotland, Wales, Parliament, the European Parliament, the socialist societies and ordinary members.

 The Clause Five meeting to agree the 2017 General Election Manifesto took place on 11 May. There was intense media interest in the event, particularly as earlier drafts of the manifesto appeared to have been leaked to various news outlets. While this was certainly unusual, particularly as most of the Clause Five meeting attendees were not shown the Manifesto before 10am on the day of the meeting, it did mean that there was widespread discussion and debate about the content, and numerous polls have shown that Labour policy is very popular with the general public.

I arrived just after 10am so I would have as much time as possible to read the Manifesto. Ideally it would have been good to have more than two hours to read and reflect on the document, especially as it is easy to get distracted. (I hadn’t seen Ann Black for a few weeks and it was tempting to just drink tea and chat as things have been fairly eventful lately.) Continue reading

Cameron might not get football – but Labour does

Looking back over the last five years, various occasions have reflected the kind of Prime Minister Cameron really is. Remember pastygate? Those country suppers with Rebeka Brooks? The time he left important Northern Ireland peace negotiations early for toattend a “rave” at Chequers with B-list celebrities for Sam Cam’s 40th birthday (made even more bizarre by the fact that she was actually 43)?

cameron_david_football

All you need to know about the kind of person Cameron is can be summed up by last week’s gaff when he claimed to “forget” which football team he supported. Rather than being honest and admitted he is not a football fan (as he has done in the past), Cameron has made an obvious and pathetic attempt to pretend he is into football. Forgetting his football team made him looked ridiculously inauthentic, foolish and lightweight.

It is interesting Cameron felt the need to pretend he liked football. I imagine he did this because football matters enormously to millions of people in Britain. Supporting a particular football club is an important part of our cultural identity. As much as some of us may sometimes like to forget which team we support, it would be like forgetting our own name.

In contrast, Labour gets football. For everyone who has yet got round to reading all 84 pages of the Labour manifesto, the section that covers important policies areas like crime and immigration includes Labour’s plans for football. Continue reading